Review // Blade Runner 2049

THE DYSTOPIAN STORY CONTINUES AS A LOS ANGELES DETECTIVE UNCOVERS A HUGE SECRET THAT WILL CHANGE THE WORLD.

We return to a bleak California where human-like robots called replicants are kept in check by Blade Runners, police who specialise in “retiring” these rogue machines. Blade Runner “K” (Ryan Gosling) is sent on a routine mission and pulls a thread that goes further than he could’ve possibly imagined.

BR2049 is a huge film on almost every scale. Decades in waiting and teased out in trailers, it delivers everything it flaunted and more. Sonically and visually it is a feast and the story is one any writer would be proud to have conceived. In a barren future, K searches for Rick Deckard, a former Blade Runner who has been missing for 30 years. During which time replicant manufacturer Niander Wallace (Jared Leto) has pushed robotics to godlike limits and the environment of earth has significantly deteriorated.

Director Denis Villeneuve was a mere 15 years old when the original was released but thankfully there are a few key people who have returned. Harrison Ford reprises his role as Deckard but arguably more important is Hampton Fancher’s return, writer of the original who has done a truly fantastic job penning 2049. The story is incredibly well written and with a run time of 2 hours and 43 minutes it really had to be. The continuity is remarkably comfortable but still easily understood as a standalone film, even if its main themes require a lot of thought.

The central performance from Ryan Gosling vindicates his position as one of the best actors working today but it is a great shame that some of the supporting cast are given little screen time to work with. Their performances are strong but the film could certainly have benefitted from greater depth or screen time for so many of the cast. Ford very naturally takes to his character and Dave Bautista shows how refined his acting skills have become in a short time. Yet while male dominated, it is the performances of the female actresses that are particularly strong, especially Sylvia Hoeks and Ana de Armas.

Villeneuve paired up with powerhouse cinematographer Roger Deakins for this undertaking but BR2049 is unlike any film either have worked on before. The scorched earth backdrop is meticulously composed and many sequences genuinely look as though they’ve been shot on another planet. The scoring process of BR2049 was not without controversy but hearsay aside it sounds fantastic and adds a lot to the film. Industrial and brash when necessary but eerily quiet and reflective at key moments. The audio and visual effects teams contribute to a wasteland nightmare we’d do well to avoid, setting the tone nicely for the cast and writing to shine.

As Mark Kermode noted in a recent blog post, the original Blade Runner is still heavily debated 35 years on. With that in mind, there are key scenes and motifs in 2049 that will almost certainly be pored over with the same vigour in coming years. BR2049 is a clever, thought provoking blockbuster, a rare beast in this day and age. The world has progressed significantly since the 1982 original but the responsibilities and repercussions of breathing life into machines has never been more pertinent than today. A fitting sequel to one of the greatest films of all time.

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